Cramp balls

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Lisa
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Cramp balls

Post by Lisa » Tue Mar 13, 2007 1:03 pm

Full of cramp balls :)
thnx to edwin for confirming
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Post by MWP admin » Tue Mar 13, 2007 10:05 pm

Ara minn haw :-)
Thanks very much for sharing... looks like a poor tree with Napoleon cannon balls!

DO you know the species name?
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Post by MWP admin » Wed Nov 14, 2007 8:56 am

I think these are those Daldinia concentrica that David Cilia spoke about in a recent email
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D. Cilia
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Post by D. Cilia » Wed Nov 14, 2007 10:51 pm

Definitely... though I never saw such a huge quantity of fruiting bodies on a single tree trunk.

ROLCAM
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Symbiosis.

Post by ROLCAM » Thu Nov 15, 2007 1:48 pm

Symbiosis, means living together. Any two different species of organisms that live together in a close relationship are symbiotic. In a symbiotic relationship, one member always benefits from the relationship. The other member may also benefit, or it may be harmed or unaffected by the relationship. There are three forms of symbiosis: parasitism, commensalism, and mutualism.

In parasitism, one organism lives on or in another organism at the expense of this organism, which is called the host. Parasites may destroy the host. An example of parasitism is the hookworm. Hookworms may live in the intestines of human beings and other animals.

In commensalism, one organism benefits from the host, which is unaffected. For example, a type of marine worm lives in the shells occupied by hermit crabs. When the crab feeds, the worm comes out to share the host's meals.

In mutualism, both parties benefit. For example, certain kinds of ants live in thorny plants. The plants provide food and nesting sites for ants. In return, the ants provide protection from insect pests. Mutualism also occurs when an alga and a fungus grow together to form a lichen, which differs from either organism. The fungus, which cannot produce its own food, gets its food from the alga. The fungus helps the alga get water.
Roland Camilleri B.Ec. FCPA.

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Post by MWP admin » Thu Nov 15, 2007 10:15 pm

Maybe my biology needs some polishing, but is it really parasitism a form of symbiosis? Is symbiosis when the 2 organsisms benefit from each other (ore there is no harm affeced to the other)?
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Post by D. Cilia » Thu Nov 15, 2007 10:57 pm

MWP admin wrote:Maybe my biology needs some polishing, but is it really parasitism a form of symbiosis? Is symbiosis when the 2 organsisms benefit from each other (ore there is no harm affeced to the other)?
Symbiosis is any kind of relationship between two species, even predation and herbivory are types of symbiosis.

Actually there are more than three types of symbiosis:
1) neutralism (not really a type of symbiosis in the 'classic' sense, this means that two species living in the same habitat without overlapping niches, meaning that none of them is affected by other eg. mosquito and beetle)
2) competition (both species are inhibited by each other eg. grey squirrel vs red squirrel)
3) mutualism (organisms are partners and usually cannot exist without each other eg. a lichen, mycorrizhae)
4) proto-cooperation (organisms are not necessarily dependent upon one another, but when they are both present the result is a positive one for both eg. oak tree and woodpecker)
5) commensalism (obligatory for one species, the other is unaffected eg. barnacles on whales, worms in hermit crab shells)
6) amensalism (one species inhibited, the other unaffected eg. rabbit and cow)
7) parasitism (eg. rabbit and fleas)
8) predation/ herbivory (eg. lion and zebra, zebra and grass)

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Post by MWP admin » Thu Nov 15, 2007 11:52 pm

Well, reading the examples makes it as everything is symbiosis on earth as one is the food or competitor of another!

I am still very curious with my photos. Whether an uncommon lichen, or a calcium ore, both are interesting for me, perhaps the latter a bit more since I never seen a 'real' ore except at the museums
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