Periploca angustifolia

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Periploca angustifolia

Post by MWP admin » Sun Feb 12, 2006 7:22 pm

I was reading the document from Mepa:

LN. 12 of 2001
ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION ACT
(CAP. 348)
Trees and Woodlands (Protection) Regulations, 2001

[Read pdf from here]

where Periploca angustifolia is listed as a "Strictly Protected Tree" while in another doucument from MEPA:

L.N. 257 of 2003
ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION ACT, 2001
(CAP. 435)
DEVELOPMENT PLANNING ACT, 1992
(CAP. 356)
Flora, Fauna and Natural Habitats Protection Regulations, 2003

[Read pdf from here]
Periploca is indicated as endemic plants which are not covered by regulation 20 (that is not protected)


Please help me to understand!

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Question 2:

Is Periploca angustifolia an endemic??? If so, I never noted this! I found several sources which mentions few places that there is this tree. Check the profile for the African Wolfbane
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Lisa
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Post by Lisa » Thu Apr 27, 2006 12:35 am

????????thnx for noting this. i now see there are many others not endemic in schedule VIII
i will enquire about this

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Post by MWP admin » Thu Apr 27, 2006 7:27 am

Lisa you are the ideal type of member here.
You really have my spirit! I keep this in mind

PLEASE, when reporting mention the website and that I noticed it (its my little reward satisfaction for this whole unpaid work)
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Post by jackpot » Thu Apr 27, 2006 8:54 am

Endemism in Malta: In an article about Maltese endemic flowering plants (in German language which will be published in "Der Palmengarten" in winter, and another one which will be presented during a scientific congress in autumn) I wrote that there are probably several other species, subspecies, or varieties endemic to Malta but still unknown due to lacking observations, and that even "only" endemic local races are of the same importance as a species. So, in many cases (e.g. Periploca angustifolia) we only "feel" that the Maltese shrubs are somewhat different, nearly the same (in fact much more!) with the Alliums, the Limoniums or the Daucus ones, and from my personal view there are several more. Unfortunately, taxonomy is not very popular during these days (decades!) and all the money for research moves to genetics or microbiology, and with the money, the students, too. Therefore, we all have not enough (not only interested, but also well educated and best qualified) students for research projects (e.g. as a master thesis) in taxonomy- and, btw: I am very happy that Sdravko act as a good qualified pioneer, as a part of a base for future cooperations (e.g. with Edwin Lanfranco).

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Post by robcar » Thu Apr 27, 2006 3:57 pm

Very interesting points jack - I recall Sdravko saying that quite a number of plants look somewhat different in Malta than they do in other places that he has seen them.

Unfortunately, people like myself are only familiar with local plants, and have no experience of the 'same' (or are they related?) species in other countries, so we cannot have any 'opinions' about this issue.

Also we lack any formal training in botany, plant systematics and taxonomy, and therefore no matter how interested we may or may not be, we are obviously very limited in what we can do, and are unfortunately unable to contribute to this type of research :(.

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Post by MWP admin » Thu Apr 27, 2006 7:39 pm

Also we lack any formal training in botany, plant systematics and taxonomy, and therefore no matter how interested we may or may not be, we are obviously very limited in what we can do, and are unfortunately unable to contribute to this type of research
I perfectely agree here! I have been crying for botanical courses in Malta for 2 years including several posts in this forum. :study:

Another post by timothy (regards funghi and plant diseases)sustains Jack views, and expressed that karyotype experiments are expensive and may have no conclusive results at the end and so they are not very much popular.


On the other hand and to play the devile act, if you have to choose one, where you would you like to invest 100,000$:- in herbal medicine or in plant taxonomy?

Taxonomy was a professional passtime for early botanists, but not much in fashion nowadays when considering other money-rendering fields in botany (or science)
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Post by robcar » Thu Apr 27, 2006 8:02 pm

I know but to be honest, I cannot, at this point in time imagine degrees in systematic botany from the University of Malta - we have to reluctantly accept our limitations - many larger, more well known Universities also do not offer such courses - I think Weber's systematic botany in Marburg is more an exception than the rule!

remember that it is not even possible to take a degree in biology on its own - you need to study chemistry too (the BSc offered locally is in Biology and Chemistry), let alone the much more specialised field of plant systematics

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Post by wolf » Thu Apr 27, 2006 8:52 pm

very interesting thread here and there is little my unscientific backgtound can contribute here - except i recall sdravko saying on comino that he only sees thymus capitata in malta whereas in other parts of med he invariably meets other sp of thymus

of course sdravko can explain much better than me so i will just look and learn and be quiet here

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Post by MWP admin » Fri Apr 28, 2006 7:08 am

RobCar, I dont perfectely agree regards univ cannot launch courses in Systemic Botany or similar. While I agree that it might not be up to Ph.D or Masters level I think there is space, resources and interess for B.Sc or at Least Diploma level as a start. We are not talking about astronomy courses or Atomical Physics here but something which we have plenty of resources and an ideal climate/environment (so much the foreigners come here to partly study it).

This leeds to another point that the course will surely attract many foreign students abroad to undertake this course (and so pay the Univ LM x000/year). Which country can compete with Malta having most of its flowers from Nov to May, ie during the sholastic year!


Also, if you look at the courses offered by the Univ, there is a lot of 'very specific' courses in various sectors so my opinion is that there should be something in Botany too, (perhaps mixed with some Environment and general biology credits too). If you want examples of such courses they are displayed in some webpage on the Univ site. Even Inst of Agriculture have opened a specific B.Sc course (Mediterranean agro systems).

As usual, one should need the basic science requirments like Biology or/and Chemistry A levels etc...
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Post by Sdravko » Tue May 02, 2006 12:14 pm

when i did my Bsc-like degree in germany i had to get a degree in physics AND chemistry like everyone in germany, and i had to dedicate much more time to these subjects than to biology. During my Msc-like studies only 30% of the classes were in Botany and many lecturers think thets still too much. so the maltese system is not too bad.
in other countries (like germany and britain) the vast majority of plant enthusiasts gain their knowledge not at universities but in plant-oriented ngo's. most of these groups have at least one trip every two weeks and/or one meeting/presentation by different members/guests every two weeks.
since maltawildplants is the only plant -oriented ng"o" in malta it could grow into such a center for nonprofessional plant studies.

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Post by Lisa » Tue May 02, 2006 6:56 pm

this is reply i got from mepa:
"the word 'endemic' has to be used relative to a context/location, e.g. endemic to Gozo, endemic to the Maltese Islands, endemic to Europe, etc.

The word 'endemic' in the context of LN 257/03 is defined in Regulation 2 of LN 257/03 as species "whose native distribution range is limited to Malta only or the Central Mediterranean region only". The African wolfsbane was included on the basis of its restricted distribution in the Mediterranean.

Hope this clarifies matter."

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Post by MWP admin » Tue May 02, 2006 9:09 pm

when i did my Bsc-like degree in germany i had to get a degree in physics AND chemistry like everyone in germany, and i had to dedicate much more time to these subjects than to biology.
Check this link - dozens of botanical courses!

http://www.emagister.net/courses-botany-kwen-125.htm


This was my first attempt on google search with results after 1 minute of browsing. So I still believe that it can be done.



Lisa:
Hope this clarifies matter.

Still confusing... The list of endemic species found on LN257 should apply to the Maltese islands (since the document concerns Malta) not to the 'whole' Central Mediterranean basin (which include some 8 countries!!!) So I find the below quote a a bit strange to say the truth.


"whose native distribution range is limited to Malta only or the Central Mediterranean region only"


Take the opportunity to thank all of you posting while I am busy with other hundreds of errands. :cry:
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